Edit ModuleShow Tags

The Dot & the Damage Done

You can’t even see the tick bite, but you know the havoc it causes. Lyme is a baffling, horrifying, growing disease, and doctors are still fighting over how to treat it. Can anything be done?



‘You’re not treating an ear infection, you’re treating a possible brain infection’
— Diane Blanchard, Time for Lyme

More than thirty years after Lyme disease was identified in the eastern Connecticut town for which it was named, more than twenty years after public-health researcher Willy Burgdorfer discovered the bacterium that causes Lyme, and four years after Connecticut found itself with the undesirable distinction of having the second-highest incidence of the disease in the country, there is still no reliable test for the dreaded illness, and no surefire cure.

So, in a largely wooded state with increasing encroachment upon deer habitats and an exploding deer population, all optimal conditions for ticks to flourish, the only effective tool against contracting Lyme is prevention.

Prevention? For active people facing a glorious Connecticut summer, this might seem to be not enough. Indeed, the state’s Department of Public Health has just announced that the disease has increased by 34 percent in the last year. And everybody knows somebody who is suffering badly right this minute.

That’s why, after appraising the myriad issues surrounding this disease, Diane Blanchard, copresident of the advocacy group Time for Lyme, said, “If anything, things are worse than ever before.”

So what’s holding things up? For one thing, it’s an elaborately tricky disease.

Why so hard to diagnose?
The corkscrew-shaped bacterium that causes Lyme, Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an ingeniousness that would be applauded if it weren’t also so perverse. This microscopic organism is transmitted to humans most often through the bite of a young black-legged deer tick that is barely bigger than a pinprick at the time of year — late spring to midsummer — when people wear summer clothes.

Delivered through the tick’s painless bite, the bacterium’s only distinctive visible manifestation is an expanding red rash, most commonly in the shape of a bull’s-eye. Known as an erythema migrans (EM), the rash is absent in anywhere from one-fourth to one-half the people who become infected.

Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags

Greenwich Agenda


Show More...


Moffly Media e-newsletters

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Most Popular Articles

  1. Keys and Tees
    Miller Motor Cars, February 26
  2. An Evening Inspired by Downton Abbey
    Topping Estate on Round Hill Road
  3. Pickle Box Sandwich Co.
    Pickle Box Sandwich Co. opens in Greenwich
  4. Ballet Beautiful
    Dance-inspired bridal looks from Pas de Deux Bridal take center stage
  5. Joan Rivers' NYC Apartment For Sale
    5100 square ft. penthouse on the market for $28M
Edit ModuleEdit Module
Web Statistics