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Editor's page

Of Transitions and Traditions

Bob Capazzo

Welcome to the December issue of Greenwich. We think you’ll find it a good read — the perfect magazine to curl up with in front of the fire when you weary of shopping for that special gift for Uncle Irving or Sister Sue.

Our focus this month is family, and to begin, I want to share some exciting news about our publishing family. Starting in January, a talented young woman named Cristin Marandino will be taking over as editor of GREENWICH Magazine, handling day-to-day operations. I am not retiring, for sure. I will remain editorial director of Moffly Publications, overseeing the content and direction of all of our publications, which means, of course, that I will be standing by to offer my two cents as top adviser.

Cristin has certainly earned her stripes.

As executive editor of our Westport Magazine, editor of our Fairfield County Weddings and longtime member of our staff, she has proven herself totally capable of running a magazine. She is native to our area, having grown up in backcountry Stamford and graduated from Greenwich Academy. Then it was on to Boston University, College of Communications, and, eventually, a job as managing editor of Vegetarian Times Magazine before coming to us. Cristin is a people person with a great sense of humor, who in her spare time has been known to skydive, rock climb and sail. If you haven’t met her yet, please introduce yourself in the grocery store or at the next benefit. And do feel free to call either of us with your ideas for stories.

Now on to traditions. Besides features on Liz Claiborne’s Jill Granoff and Greenwich squash champs, we visit with some of the many Greenwich residents who have made it a family tradition to get out there in force — year after year — and help others over the holidays. If you are inspired to join these spirited volunteers, we have included a list of agencies you might contact. Meals on Wheels, for instance, needs drivers and kitchen help.

Then there’s the nativity pageant on Maher Avenue put on by the children of the Rockwellian neighborhood for the past sixty years, including little Dickon Hollister, now oncologist Dr. Dickerman Hollister. It’s not always easy to inject humor into a publication, but, believe me, it’s there in the unsolicited piece he wrote for us about his childhood role as “the fourth king.” Another family tradition, especially for fathers and daughters, is the Junior League Cotillion that has been raising money for League projects and training young ladies for community service for thirty years.

Finally, a passing thought. We will not be breaking a twenty-year tradition. I will continue to have a voice in GREENWICH Magazine, as Jack does with his monthly column. We founders will ever have our say.

Have a wondrous and merry holiday season — and brilliant New Year.