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Editor's page

Of Real Estate, Railroads and Running MasterCard



Bob Capazzo

It’s April and we can’t afford to spend it “fooling” around — even on the first day. To your Greenwich Magazine staff, spring means fat issues and lots of hard work. Okay. Some fun, too.

Our traditional focus this month is real estate, so we canvassed local realtors to see where home buyers really want to live — the hot neighborhoods — and why. When Jack and I moved to Riverside in 1963, Greenwich folk could barely find their way down the Post Road to our front door. But things sure have changed. Houses on the eastern end of town are selling at a premium now, and once settled into one, families are there to stay.

We also talked to people who style your house for sale — a booming business in a slower-than-usual market. According to a USA Today survey, staged homes sell in half the time others do and for 6.3 percent more than their asking price. This article offers practical staging tips that may come in handy when you sell your house. You’ll even learn how to pull off the “immaculate perception.”

In another piece, CEO Robert Selander talks about his successes and challenges at MasterCard. Then we have a totally Greenwich story we got permission to pick up from Golfweek. It’s town history, golf history and Manero’s restaurant history all rolled into one great read. Have a good time!

And finally, we discovered Dick Banyard’s other passion — besides his wife Sandy and his ophthalmology practice: model trains. To be specific, the Indian Harbor Railroad. It chugs through a layout representing our town and its neighbors circa 1941, all built by the good doctor himself on weekends and when he was stuck at home on call over the past ten years. Coincidentally, the first Gold Record was awarded to Glenn Miller by RCA in 1942 for guess what? “Chattanooga Choo-Choo.”

A behind-the-scenes comment on Bob Capazzo’s1988 photograph of Debbie and Russ Reynolds with Barbara and George Bush on page 177: We have to be proud of our earliest retouching effort, long before Photoshop. There was so much reflection in the right lens of the vice president’s glasses that we couldn’t see his eye at all. So we cleverly duplicated the other and popped it in. Where there’s a will …

Letters about our January 60th Anniversary issue are still coming in, and we love you for writing them. One of our “Sixty Things in Sixty Years That Changed Our Town” had to do with Greenwich Avenue being two-way in the fifties. I must say that we’re happy the powers that be haven’t taken away our traffic police officers. Consider the scene with traffic lights — the double-parking, jaywalking and light running. Let’s keep our charm, our shoppers and merchants happy, and our intersections safe.

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